Game casserole

Game casserole

Butchers and game dealers often sell chunks of mixed game for casseroling. Adding the right flavours – smoked bacon, bay, juniper and thyme – will give you a special and tasty supper dish (which can also be used as a pie filling), and generally at a good price compared to other game. We like to use dark meat, such as venison leg or shoulder, mallard duck and wild boar, along with paler game (pheasant, rabbit and suchlike). The other trick is to use the best smoked bacon you can buy – the stronger the smoke, the better. As it cooks, it combines with the other ingredients to release a magical wintry aroma.

Game casserole

Serves 6
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 onions, chopped
100g (3½oz) smoked streaky bacon, chopped
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 tablespoon plain flour
400ml (14fl oz) hot chicken or game stock
200ml (7fl oz) red wine
1.25kg (2½lb) game, ideally 50:50 dark and white meat, cut into
3.5–5-cm (1½–2-in) chunks
100g (3½oz) cranberry or redcurrant sauce
2 bay leaves
2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves, or 1 teaspoon dried
½ tablespoon juniper berries, crushed
225g (7½oz) carrots, cut into matchsticks
225g (7½oz) button mushrooms, trimmed
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

Pour the olive oil into a large flameproof casserole dish over a medium-low heat. When hot, add the onions and bacon with a little sea salt and plenty of black pepper, and fry until soft (about 10–15 minutes), stirring occasionally. Add the garlic and cook for another minute or so, then sprinkle in the flour. Pour in the hot stock and mix well. Add the wine, bring to the boil and bubble for a couple of minutes to thicken slightly.

Game casserole

Add the game, cranberry or redcurrant sauce, bay leaves, thyme and juniper berries. Bring to the boil, then cover and simmer for 45 minutes. Add the carrots and mushrooms and cook for another 45 minutes, until the meat is tender. Taste and adjust the seasoning as necessary.

Serve with dauphinoise, baked or sauté potatoes and seasonal vegetables.

Roast rabbit with pancetta

Roast rabbit with pancetta

Roast rabbit with pancetta

Rabbit has always been popular in France and Italy, but only recently has it been starting to reappear on British tables. We tend to sell the more tender farmed rabbit for roasting in dishes such as this. Wild rabbit can be tougher and benefits from longer stewing, but is also a meat that’s worth rediscovering. Rabbit offal is famously delicious, so get this with the rabbit if possible in order to use it in the sauce.

Serves 4
1 farmed rabbit, jointed into 2 pieces of saddle and 4 legs (ask your butcher in advance)
6 small sprigs of tarragon
100g (3½oz) thin-cut smoked pancetta or smoked streaky bacon
2 banana shallots, cut in half lengthways
2 celery sticks, each cut into 3 long pieces
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

Roast rabbit with pancetta

For the sauce
knob of butter
1 teaspoon plain flour
200ml (7fl oz) hot chicken stock
rabbit offal (optional but good)
150ml (¼ pint) full-fat crème fraîche
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon finely chopped tarragon

Preheat the oven to 190°C/375°F/Gas Mark 5.

Season the rabbit joints with a little salt and a fair amount of pepper. Lay a sprig of tarragon on top of each piece. Wrap a slice of the pancetta around each piece of saddle and lay slices over the legs so that they fit snugly, tucking the ends underneath.

Put the shallots and celery in a roasting tray and place the rabbit on top. Roast in the oven for 45 minutes, or until the pancetta is crisp and the rabbit cooked through but still juicy. Transfer to a plate, cover with foil and a couple of tea towels, and leave in a warm place.

To make the sauce, put the roasting tray on the hob over a medium-low heat. Melt the butter in it, then sprinkle with the flour and stir well. Gradually add the hot stock, stirring hard as you do so to mix it with the flour and scraping up any tasty bits in the bottom of the pan. If using rabbit offal, add it now as it will give extra flavour to the stock. Stir in the crème fraîche and mustard and leave to simmer for a couple of minutes. Bring to the boil and bubble away to thicken slightly. Strain the liquid into a jug and stir in the chopped tarragon.

Roast rabbit with pancetta

Put the rabbit pieces on warm plates, one leg on each plate and adding the saddle pieces to the forelegs, which are less meaty than the hind legs (or giving them to the people with the biggest appetites). Pour some sauce on to each plate and serve with potatoes and a crisp green salad or green beans.

Venison with pink peppercorns & redcurrants

Venison with pink peppercorns & red currantsThe most tender (and expensive) cut of venison is the loin, but this recipe also works with less pricey alternatives, such as steaks cut from the haunch. If you are able to state a preference, go for steaks cut from the rump end or topside for tenderness. Otherwise, use silverside, which is more of a working muscle but still good and tasty. The photo overleaf shows the loin fillet coated in lardo (cured and thinly sliced Italian pork fat) to keep the lean meat nice and moist. You can cut this fat off on your plate, or eat some or all of it. The rich flavour of venison is complemented here by a deliciously piquant sweet-and-sharp sauce.

Serves 4
3 tablespoons pink peppercorns in vinegar, rinsed and roughly crushed
1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves
2 tablespoons olive oil
¼ teaspoon sea salt flakes
4 venison steaks, each about 2.5cm (1in) thick and 125–150g (4–5oz), or 4 larded loin fillet steaks, about 5cm (2in) thick and 7cm (3in) in diameter (fillet can be up to 5cm [2in] thick, depending on the season and what type of deer it comes from. A butcher can join 2 loins together to make a bigger portion)

For the Sauce
200ml (7fl oz) chicken or game stock
50ml (2fl oz) red wine
juice of 1 orange
50ml (2fl oz) double cream
1 bay leaf
1 tablespoon redcurrant jelly
8 sprigs of fresh redcurrants (optional)
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce

Combine the peppercorns, thyme leaves, oil and salt in a small bowl. Lay the venison steaks or fillets on a chopping board and spread about half the peppercorn mixture over just the top of them. If using loin, pat about a quarter of the mixture on both sides of the meat.

Venison with pink peppercorns & red currants

If using steaks
Place a large, heavy-based frying pan over a high heat. When hot, add 2 of the steaks and cook, peppered-side down, for about 2 minutes, or until brown. (Don’t cook more than 2 at a time as it will lower the temperature of the pan too much and make it harder to brown the meat.) Brush more of the peppercorn mixture on the steaks, then turn and cook for another 2 minutes, or until brown, and the meat is medium-pink inside. (If using a digital thermometer, the temperature should be 55–60°C [130–140°F] for medium rare to medium, and 70°C [160°F] for well done, remembering that the temperature will rise by 5°C [40°F] or so after you take the meat off the heat.) Transfer to a plate, cover and keep warm, then cook and rest the other steaks in the same way.

If using fillets
Preheat the oven 190°C/375°F/Gas Mark 5. Meanwhile, place a large ovenproof frying pan over a high heat. When hot, cook the fillets 2 at a time for about 1½ minutes on each side. Transfer to the oven for 10 minutes, until done to your liking. This timing will give you meat that is pink in the middle. If using a digital thermometer, the temperature should be the same as specified above. Transfer the fillets to a plate, cover and keep warm, then cook and rest the other fillets in the same way.

Venison with pink peppercorns & red currants

To make the sauce, put the pan back on the hob, pour in the stock and stir to scrape up any tasty bits stuck to the bottom. Add the wine, orange juice, cream and bay leaf (and any remaining peppercorn mixture if cooking loin), bring to the boil and let it bubble away until reduced by about half. Stir in the redcurrant jelly and redcurrants (if using). Once the jelly has dissolved, stir in the Worcestershire sauce. Return the steaks to the pan to warm briefly in the sauce. Serve immediately.

Meat grinder and sausage stuffer

Meat grinder and sausage stuffer

Most meat grinder and sausage stuffer accompany pipes intended for stuffing wieners. They will work when absolutely necessary yet can be a genuine cerebral pain to utilize. The fundamental issue is that they don’t push the meat compellingly enough, so meat grinder and sausage stuffer can take five or ten times longer than it ought to. At the same time, the meat is gradually warming up.

I’ve would do well to fortunes stuffing hotdog with a baked good pack (this requires two individuals—one to crush the sack, the other to pull the housings off the end as the meat turns out), yet in the event that you’re truly genuine about wiener making, you’ll need a cylinder based stuffer that pushes the meat out with a lever as opposed to attempting to constrain it out with a screw. The outcome is speedier, more tightly hotdogs with less air bubbles.

Meat grinder and sausage stuffer

There’s truly very little to it regarding the matter of utilizing an best meat grinder and sausage stuffer. Essentially, all you must do amass the processor with the plate you longing, take your trimmed meat (processors detest ligament and connective tissues, so make a point to trim it full scale), encourage it into the container, turn the processor on (if utilizing a processor on a stand blender connection, a moderately quick speed is the best approach—I’ve found that around 6 to 8 on the our produces the best results), and press the meat through. Ground meat, basic is that.

After you’re done granulating, before you dismantle the processor or move the dish by any stretch of the imagination, take a couple wadded-up paper towels and go them through the meat grinder and sausage stuffer simply like you are pounding meat. They won’t turn out the flip side, yet they will push out any stray bits of meat that have figured out how to stay behind, and in addition assist clean with trip within the food tube and shaft. Better yield and less demanding tidy up result.

Meat grinder and sausage stuffer

The one unmistakable point of interest that meat grinder and sausage stuffer have is that a large portion of them have a converse capacity—a continuous saver on the off chance that you are attempting to slash particularly troublesome meat with heaps of connective tissue to get got in the blade.

Meat-eating in human evolution

meat history

Meat-eating in human evolution

Meat was implemented in human diet since 2.6 million ago. According the previous studies there is such as strong evidence of meat and marrow eating found on human bones. Obviously there is a notorious approach of the benefits that meat and marrow provide to us. They are calorie-dense with crucial and all-important amino acids and micronutrients.

Throughout animal consumption increased, hominis increased their mass, size without losing mobility, agility or sociality. Back in 500,000 years ago we used different methods of hunting like fire, wood and flint. Evidences have been found in Koobi Fora, Chesowanja, and Swartkrans (South Africa). Multiple studies found signatures in genes in humans that played an important role in human dietary adaptation. But it is pretty uncertain to say when these psychological and anatomical changes did happen.

meat-eating

 Around July 1608, Hernando Arias de Saavedra better known as Hernandarias outlined America as a great resource for cattle rising and farming owing the exceptional quality of its land. Since that date cattle raising the meat is of the biggest economic output of the region. We all know that humans are categorized as omnivorous and have killed and hunted animals since stone time. Meanwhile the human evolved, civilization allowed us to domesticate animals like sheep, pigs, chickens and cattle, in the long run going into industrial scale.

Early humans used to hunt mammoth animals such as bison and deer. As previously talked, domestication (since glacial period) allowed the development of meat production. Let’s give some examples of some of the animals that were mainly involved in early civilizations.

meat eating sheep

  • Sheep: Originated in Western Asia and domesticated with help of dogs distinctly possible as early as the 8th millennium before Christ. Various castes were settled in Mesopotamian and Egypt.
  • Cattle: Highly domesticated in Mesopotamian for agriculture purposes about 5000 years before Christ. Cattle optimization for beef production began around the middle of 18th
  • Domestic pigs: Descended from wild boards. Known to exists about 2500 years before Christ in Hungary and in Troy (ancient Greek). Pork and ham were took a greet commercial importance in Greco-Roman times.

meat eating

Meat, the flesh from animals, has contributed to the welfare of man for centuries, the muscle and associated fatty tissues supplying him with a major portion of his protein and energy needs.